CSX

Purpose: compile threads of information from the various CSX conversations on the web and build a little reference place that is easy to print, read, and above all else...understand! Credit will be given to the author when known.-

This information is mainly for enthusiasts of the Chessie System, and More! (aka CSX). If you are using this page for some sort of "Corporate raiding." Well, you aren't a very good Corporate Raider, my friend-

This is our hobby and recreation ergo it is your responsibility to use information herein without intent to harm, cause destruction, perform an illegal action, personal-profit, or to be used on instruments of legal action against another entity. Finally, just to really sum-up the whole ball of wax...I place this project online for friends and others who enjoy the Railroad. It's that simple!

For now, this will be the only page...but it'll grow over time- The Horizontal bars separate each subject. (maybe one day a little section will appear with an in-page link to that section....maybe, just maybe...)


The Second Main

LaPorte, IN Abandonment | Newspaper Articles


The Power Board

Active CSX Roster (removed for editing)

CSX Paint Schemes

Some of these mnemonics have been adopted from the listing originally created by Allan Brougham. However, I've chosen to deviate from this established path mainly to simplify everything for stastical purposes.(4)

TCX System
Bullsheet System
Colors
ON1 YN3 Front- Yellow-Orange, Blue CSX lettering: Body-Navy w/ Orange text.
YN2 YN2 Front- Yellow, Blue Text: Body-Blue & Gray w/ Yellow Trim. Blue text.
YN1 CSX/YN/YN1 Front- Yellow, Blue Text: Body- Gray & Blue Stripe w/Yellow trim. Blue Text
CR n/a Front & Body- Royal Blue with White Text. May have CSXT road no. patch
OR1 Pumpkin Front & Body- International Orange w/ Navy text.
GN1 CSX Gray/CSX Gray YN Front- Gray nose w/ Blue text. Body- Gray with Blue Text.
FLS Family Lines/YN Gray background w/ Red-Orange & Yellow Logo + text.
CH1 Chessie Standard Chessie System Colors; Yellow, Red-Orange, and Navy trim

***Please note: The roster did have the current paint scheme listed in previous versions. Truth be known, there are several other resources on the web that list the current locomotive colors, so why duplicate what works?


Jargon

...but a few of many nicknames, etc. of CSX's heritage.

Wild Mary = Western Maryland

Ellen N. = Lousiville & Nashville

B&O = Baltimore & Ohio

C&O = Chesapeake & Ohio

ACL = Atlantic Coast Line

Family Lines = Generally used to describe the Seaboard system post ACL/L&N/CLinchfield/SCL merger.

SCL = Seaboard Coast Line

SAL = Seaboard Air Line


CSX Symbology

The modern CSX Symbol system started in July 1987 as a derivative from the Seaboard System. Prior to July 1987, trains were given names relating to destination on the Chessie System.(2,3)

Merchandise Trains

These are either commodity or manifest trains operating through the CSX System. In general, the numbering goes like this:

Q100s - Intermodal
Q200s - Automotive
Q300s - Northern East-West Manifests
Q400s - Eastern North-South Manifests
Q500s - Western North-South Manifests
Q600s - Cross-Corridors (i.e., Northwest to Southeast)

L-Series trains operate on an alternate schedule or have different blocking vs. a regular Q-Series merchandise train (i.e., L100 is an alteration of Q100). S-Series signify an advanced section of a regular Q-Series merchandise train.

Coal Trains

The need to move coal was the initial push for the railroad. In fact, one could say Coal is the Railroads commodity. The following symbols seem to be used: E-Series (generally empty hoppers), N-Series, V-Series, U-Series, T-Series.

Single-Bulk Commodity Trains

This is essentially the K-Series of trains. Steel, iron ore, and Coke make up a large percentage of the manifests. However, stone, phosphate, and other minerals are not uncommon depending on your area. For example, Ohio will see a larger number of Steel-related manifests vs. Stone manifests.

K100s Iron Ore
K200s Chemicals
K300s Coke
K400s
K500s Steel, Metals
K600-649 Paper
K650-699 Food
K700s
K800s Potash & Sulphur
K900s Aggregates (Stone, gravel, limestone, etc.)

Locals

These are movements that will stay within a single subdivision For example, let's say Bob's Meat market gets a refrigerator car once a week. Well, the Atlanta Local train originating from the closest yard will provide switching services to Bob's market by removing the empty car and placing (spotting) the full car.

Standard symbology would be: A-Series, B-Series, C-Series, D-Series, F-Series, H-Series, J-Series, and O-Series.

Odds - n - Ends:

G-Series. These are for Grain movements, which are very random. A Grain train could show-up anytime...anywhere!

P-Series. Reserved for Amtrak or other Passenger Trains. Can also be used for Important-special trains.

P000s Amtrak
P200s MARC
P300-350 VRE
P370-310 Amtrak
P600s FDOT (Florida Dept. of Transportation)
P800s MARC
P900s Circus Trains, extra passenger specials

R-Series. Re-routed trains. During the recent 2004 Hurricane season, CSX had to re-route a significant number of trains in the Southeast. Once the train departs its schedule, it obtains the "R" in place of its regular symbol to signify to dispatch a re-routed train. This only applies to Q & L-Series movements.

X-Series. This is basically an Extra movement. Albeit a few locomotives or a gaggle of old beat-up box cars on their final voyage. Basically, the train wasn't planned and isn't standard-

Y-Series. Yard movement with or without cars. Great example would be locals moving freight within Cincinnati terminal between various yards. Often called "Yard Job."

Z-Series. This symbol is applied to trains belonging to foreign (i.e., NS) road using CSX tracks.

Advanced Symbology

Well, if your head isn't ready to explode..please read-on...it gets better!

CSX also likes to add an origin date or projected load date (depends on the train). Example, Q100-01 can be deciphered into an Intermodal Train that departed on the first day of the month. The date will always be expressed as "-01" following a standard calendar (i.e., 1-31). As far as I know, its standard practice to assign a date to every train. Those with scanners can sometimes hear the engineer ID there train as "Q100-01" or they might just say "Q100." It just depends-

The Next Generation of Symbology

Word on the street The Chessie was going to convert to a UP-style of numbering. For Example, I-CHINYC1-21, can be read by breakign the symbol into three parts:

Train Type - Origin/Destination w/section - Date of Scheduled Departure. Therefore I-CHINYC1-21 is saying "Intermodal" - "Origin: Chicago Destination: New York City Section1" - "Scheduled to depart on the 21st." Again, this only "word on the street" whether this is accurate or the future, only time will tell...


References

Note: look for the [1] at the end of various sections indicating material contained is being referenced.

(1) Schafer, Mike. Classic American Railroads. Hong Kong: MBI with Andover Publications, 1996.

(2) Sunderland, Jeffrey A. The Railroad Network of Summit, Medina, and Portage County Ohio. Akron, OH: Sunderland ca.1990

(3) Totten, C.C. The Official Guide of the Railways and Steam Navigation Lines of the United States, Puerto Rico, Canada, Mexico, and Cuba. New York City: National Railway Publication Company Oct 1966 No.5

(4) Brougham, Allen The Bull Sheet (1997): n. pag. Online. Internet. 28 Nov 2004. Available: www.bullsheet.com

(5) Ross, David & Solomon, Brian. North American Trains. Dubai. Barnes & Noble, Inc. with Amber Books Ltd, 2004.

[6] Rhodes, Michael. North American RailYards. St. Paul, MN MBI Publishing Co. 2003

[7] Hauck, John W. Narrow Gauge in Ohio The Cincinnati, Lebanon, and Northern Railway. unknown. Pruett Publishing. 1986.

[8] unknown. History of Butler County, Ohio with Illustrations and sketches of its Represenative Men & Pioneers. unknown. Western Biographical Publishing Co. 1882.


System Organization

Divisions

Albany, Allegheny, Appalachian, Atlanta, C&O, Chicago, Detroit, Florence, Great Lakes, Jacksonville, Louisville, Nashville

Major Yards

First, the universal Definition of a "Major Yard" always includes a Hump with Classification Bowl no matter the supporting facilities.

Avon (Indianapolis, IN)

Constructed 1960 by New York Central for $14.0M ( 2005 = $88.7M).

Boyles (Birmingham, AL)

Constructed 1958 by Louisville & Nashville for $10.0M (2005 = $65.6M).

Cumberland (Cumberland, MD)

Constructed 1960 by Baltimore & Ohio for $10.0M (2005 = $63.4M).

DeWitt (Syracuse, NY)

Constructed 1906 by New York Central

Frontier (Buffalo, NY)

Constructed 1957 by New York Central for $10.5M (2005 = $71.4M).

Hamlet (Hamlet, NC)

Constructed 1954 by Seaboard Coast Line for $8.0M (2005 = $55.2M).

Osborn (Louisville, KY)

Constructed 1977 by Seaboard System

Queensgate (Cincinnati, OH)

Constructed 1980 by Chessie System for $71.0M (2005 = $180.3M). Queensgate (also known as The "Q") is the only true CSX Yard as it was built to replace eaight smaller Yards within metro Cincinnati that included A (B&O), Brighton (B&O), Mill Creek (B&O), Oakley, (B&O), Stock (B&O), Libery Street (C&O), Silver Grove (C&O), and DeCoursey (still used, but deserted in 1984, L&N) just west of downtown in the Mill Creek Valley area. The Q contains an Intermodal Terminal, Diesel repair facility, Car repair facility, Track Yard, and two Humps with 98 class tracks.Capacity is approx. 6,000 cars and the yard can hump approx. 2,100 cars/day.

Radnor (Nashville, TN)

Constructed 1954 by Louisville & Nashvilleice

Rice (Waycross, GA)

Constructed 1978 by Seaboard System for $56.0M (2005 = $170.6M). The yard is named after former ACL/Seaboard President, W. Thomas Rice(1913-2006) who held the post from 1957-1977. The current yard was constructed over a former ACL yard taht was constructed in the late 1800s. Rice contains a Heavy Repair Diesel shop, car repair shop, 2 Humps w/64 track bowl and 10 local tracks. Capacity is approx. 8500 cars and apporx. 2,700 cars are processed daily.

Russell (Russell, KY)

Originally named "Fitzpatrick Yard", Constructed 1800s by Chesapeake & Ohio

Selkirk (near Albany, NY)

Constructed 1924 by New York Central

Stanley (Toledo, OH)

Constructed 1913 by Toledo & Ohio Central, T&OC purcahsed by New York Central

Tilford (Atlanta, GA)

Constructed 1957 by Louisville & Nashville for $11.0M (2005 = $74.78M),

Walbridge (Toledo, OH)

Constructed by Chesapeake & Ohio

Willard (Willard, OH)

Constructed 1874 by the Baltimore, Pittsburgh, & Chicago Railway Company, Ohio Division (Owned by the B&O), then re-built by Baltimore & Ohio in 1947.

Subdivisions (Alphabetical order)

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Achan Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 7 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals None

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Auburndale Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 137 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown - DTC

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 110,000 feet

Yards

Return to Subdivision Index

Bainbridge Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 38 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown - DTC

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 13,800 feet

Yards

Bone Valley Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 47 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown - DTC

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 2,810 feet

Yards

Brewster Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 13 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown - DTC

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Yards

Brooker Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 39 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown - DTC

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 4,200 feet

Yards

Brooksville Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 49 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown - DTC

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 4,200 feet

Yards

Brunswick Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 49 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Yards

Return to Subdivision Index

CL&W Subdivision

The Cleveland, Lorain, and Western in its original form connected Lorain, OH with Massilon, OH (and possibly further south to Dover, OH). Lorain was a major industrial center in the early 1900s possessing the American Shipbuilding Company and a Major Steel Mill (former LTV?) Needless to say, Lorain had a large appetite for all things steel along with a major need to export local commodities to other markets (ie, steel). Lorain also had (and still does) several Automotive manufacturers, but it seems NS serves these industries. The CL&W was built in the 1860s during the post-civil war private financing endeavours of the major east coast players.

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 39 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals B&O style CPLs protecting wye with New Castle Subdivision (Sterling, OH) at-Grade crossings of the CSX Indianapolis Line (Grafton, OH) and NS Bellvue Line (Elyria, OH)

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 17,784 feet

Callahan Subdivision

Operated by Jacksonville Division

Pre-CSX Operator Seaboard Coast Line

Length 20 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 17,600 feet

Yards

Central Ohio Subdivision

Operated by Ohio Central, Owned by CSX

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 60 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 13,143 feet

Cincinnati Terminal Subdivision

Cincinnati Terminal is truly that, a terminal. Its a very important North-South point in the System acting as a gateway between the Southern and Northern States. The oldest ancenstoral CSX line was built in 1848 from Hamilton, OH south to the Mill Creek valley west of present downtown Cincinnati. The Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton (CH&D) operated this line until 1917 when the B&O purchased the company through receivership. The original CH&D line was extended north from Hamilton, OH to Dayton, OH in 1850 forming the sourthn portion of the present day Toledo Subdivision. The L & N gained entrance to Cincinnati from the southwest by purchasing the Louisville, Cincinnati, & Lexington railroad in 1881 which is known today as the LCL Subdivision. In 1891, the L&N purchased the Kentucky Central (organized in 1871) which connected Covington, KY to Livingston, KY or the modern day CC Subdivision. The other notable L&N property is the now vacated DeCoursey Yard which was built byt eh L&N in 1917 and placed into to Semi-retirement upon completion of Queensgate yard in 1984. (Personal note: My Grandfather worked for the L&N originally out of London, KY at teh age of 14. He moved to Corbin, KY and finally DeCoursey Yard in the mid-1920s. Unfortunately, he never related much about the experience other than free rides atop box cars.) [1,6,7,8]

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length 53 Miles Double Track, 6 miles Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS, B&O CPLs, C&O

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Yards

Cleveland Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 35 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals B&O style CPLs protecting at-Grade crossings of the CSX Short Line (Parma, OH)

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Cleveland Short Line Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length 21 Miles Double Track, 1 mileSingle Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Cleveland Terminal Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length 10 Miles Double Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS

Junctions

Yards

Crawsfordville Branch Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length 34 Miles Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Dark Territory

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 6,100 feet

Return to Subdivision Index

Erie West Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length 74 Miles, Double Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS, B&O CPLs may exist in a few areas (March2005)

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 54,340 feet

Return to Subdivision Index

Ft. Wayne Line Subdivision

Operated by Chicago, Ft. Wayne & Eastern (CFW&E), Rail America

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length 82 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Unknown

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 30,360 feet

Fostoria Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio, Chesapeake & Ohio

Length E-W, 0.9 miles, N-S, 0.7miles, Double Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Frankfort Secondary Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length 37 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals Dark Territory

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 11,900 feet

Return to Subdivision Index

Garrett Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 62.9 miles, Double Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 17,947 feet

Greenwich Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length Single Track 16 miles

Operational Towers

Signals NYC Tri-Color

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 5,510 feet

Return to Subdivision Index

Indianapolis Subdivision (Great Lakes Division)

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator B&O

Length Single Track, 14 Miles

Operational Towers

Signals None, DTC

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Return to Subdivision Index

Lafayette Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Conrail

Length Single Track, 76 Miles

Operational Towers

Signals NYC Tri-Color

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 28, 822 feet

Yards

Return to Subdivision Index

New Castle Subdivision

The New Castle (NC) Sub is located primarily in NE Ohio and connects New Castle, PA with Willard, OH. The line started life under the ownership of the Pittsburgh, Youngstown, and Western RR (PY&W) in 1881 connecting New Castle, PA to Cuyahoga Falls, OH. The PY&W then purchased property from the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus(CA&C) to continue the mainline from Cuyahoga Falls, OH to present-day Clinton, OH (aka Warwick), completing the project in 1891, connecting with the Akron & Chicago Jct. RR(A&CJ) the same year at Warwick. The A&CJ formed the western portion of the modern subdivision to Willard, Ohio (then Chicago Jct.) creating a connection to Chicago at Willard. The A&CJ + PY&W were merged to form the Pittsburgh and Western in 1891, which was leased by the B&O prior to the Warwick connection.(2)

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 134 Miles (15 miles Single-track)

Operational Towers

Signals Majority B&O CPLs, however SAFETRANS will be replacing the CPLs over the Summer2005

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 52,233 feet

Newton Falls Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 14 Miles, Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals None

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity None

Return to Subdivision Index

Toledo Subdivision

Operated by Louisville Division

Pre-CSX Operator B&O

Length Overall: 170 miles - 17 miles Double Track - 153 miles Single Track

Operational Towers

Signals NYC Tri-Color

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 144,435 feet

Yards

Return to Subdivision Index

Willard Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 57.9 Miles, Double Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity 17,947 feet

Willard Terminal Subdivision

Operated by Great Lakes Division

Pre-CSX Operator Baltimore & Ohio

Length 15.6 Miles, Double Track, Yard, Quad Track, and Triple Track

Operational Towers

Signals SAFETRANS

Junctions

Subdivision Siding Capacity N/A